Tag: BBC

Parsley Sidings

Parsley Sidings was a BBC Radio sitcom created by Jim Eldridge. It starred Arthur Lowe and Ian Lavender (who were also starring in the television wartime sitcom Dad’s Army at that time), together with Kenneth Connor from the Carry On films. The scripts are by Jim Eldridge (who would later go on to write for many more series, the most successful being the BBC’s King Street Junior). The show is set in a

Much Binding in the Marsh

During WW2, there was a radio show for the Services called “Merry Go Round which comprised of three separate series: one for the Army, one for the Navy, and one for the Royal Air Force. These rotated, so that each was heard once every three weeks. The Army show was “Studio Stand Easy”, starring comedian

The Man In Black (1950)

After her husband’s untimely death, Bertha Clavering (Betty Ann Davies) became an extremely wealthy widow, determined to keep the estate for herself and her daughter, Janice (Sheila Burrell). Returning home after a lengthy stay abroad, step-daughter Joan (Hazel Penwarden), rightful heiress to the Clavering wealth, unwittingly enters a house of terror and intimidation as Bertha

Beyond Our Ken

Beyond Our Ken featured characters similar to those later featured in Round the Horne, for instance Betty Marsden’s Fanny Haddock (which parodied Fanny Cradock). It was also notable for Pertwee’s Frankie Howerd impersonation, Hankie Flowered, and Hugh Paddick’s working-class pop singer Ricky Livid – the name being a mickey-take on contemporary pop singers’ stage names

The Navy Lark

The Navy Lark was a BBC radio comedy written by Laurie Wyman and George Evans about the crew of The Royal Navy ship HMS Troutbridge and their mis-adventures. The show was first aired on The Light Programme in 1959 and ran for thirteen series until 1976 making it the second longest running radio programme the

It Sticks Out Half a Mile

It Sticks Out Half a Mile was a BBC Radio sitcom created by Harold Snoad and Michael Knowles as a sequel to the television war sitcom Dad’s Army, for which Snoad and Knowles had written radio adaptations. The original pilot episode, set in 1948, involved former bank manager and Home Guard Captain George Mainwaring (Arthur

British Radio Comedy

Radio comedy has not only entertained audiences for some 70 years, it’s also been a medium for change in British society itself. Bandwaggon established a new formula of comedy sketches and music. At the beginning of the war it was a wonderful boost for morale. After the War there was the famous Goon Show, created

Steptoe & Son Radio Series

Steptoe and Son is a British sitcom written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about two rag and bone men living in Oil Drum Lane, a fictional street in Shepherd’s Bush, London. Four series were broadcast by the BBC from 1962 to 1965, followed by a second run from 1970 to 1974. Its theme tune,